BME BioMedical Engineering Department
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Academic staff and research areas

Full-Time Staff

H.L. Galiana

Chair, Biomedical Engineering
Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Associate Member, Otolaryngology
Associate Member, Electrical Engineering

BioMedical Engineering Department
Duff Medical Building
3775 University Street, Room 308
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-6738
Fax: +1-514-398-7461
E-mail: henrietta.galiana at mcgill.ca

Dr. Galiana's research interests focus on signal processing and the modelling of control strategies for the orientation of eyes and head, and related issues of platform coordination and sensory fusion. Theoretical predictions are tested in the vestibular clinic for patient evaluation, and by porting to biomimetic robot systems.

Dr. Galiana's work in the field of sensorimotor control involves modelling with topologically relevant circuits. Her work on nystagmus analysis has led to automated methods for the classification of switching segments, applicable to any eye reflex and to other non-linear signals in breathing or spectroscopy. These pre-classification algorithms have allowed the unmasking of unexpected reflex dynamics and led to new hypotheses for both gaze control and arm control. These are demonstrated in real robotic platforms and suggest much simpler strategies for prostheses.

R.E. Kearney

Director, Graduate Program, Biomedical Engineering
Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Professor, Physiology
Associate Member, School of Physical & Occupational Therapy
Associate Member, Mechanical Engineering

BioMedical Engineering Department
Duff Medical Building
3775 University Street, Room 309
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-6737
Fax: +1-514-398-7461
E-mail: robert.kearney at mcgill.ca
Web site

Human Motor Control. This research addresses the role of the peripheral neuromuscular system in the control of posture and movement. System identification methods are used to address three main questions: (1) What are the mechanical properties of human joints and how do they vary under normal physiological conditions? (2) What mechanisms are responsible for generating the mechanical behavior; what are the relative roles of intrinsic muscle properties and reflex mechanisms? (3) What role do these mechanical properties play in the control of posture and movement?

Biomedical System Identification and Signal Analysis. This research focuses on the development of tools and techniques for the analysis of biomedical signals and system and their application to clinically relevant problems . The emphasis is on practical methods for the identification of linear-time-varying and nonlinear systems within a continuous-time, nonparametric context. Current application areas are: (1) human motor control; (2) respiratory monitoring for apnea detection/prediction in the pediatric recovery room; and (3) automated decision support for electronic fetal monitoring.

Bioinformatics. Proteomics is a relatively new field that focuses on the large-scale study of the location and relative abundance of proteins within cells and organs. Dr. Kearney's research aim is to develop algorithms that improve the accuracy, throughout and sensitivity of proteomics measurements and assist in inferring biological significance from them. There are three main areas of work: (1) the deployment and operation of a robust, secure information technology infrastructure to support the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of proteomics data; (2) the development of CellMapBase, a custom database and Web-based application for the distributed acquisition and analysis of proteomics data; and (3) the elucidation and evaluation of new algorithms and tools to assess, validate and improve the efficiency and accuracy of protein identification and abundance measurement.

J.D. Bobyn

Professor, Surgery
Professor, Biomedical Engineering

Orthopedic Surgery Department
Montreal General Hospital
1650 Cedar Avenue, Room A2156
Montréal, QC  H3G 1A4
Tel: +1-514-934-1934 ext. 44558
Fax: +1-514-934-8261
E-mail: jdbobyn at hotmail.com

Dr. Bobyn studies engineering and biomaterials issues related to the design and function of joint replacement implants, particularly for the hip and knee. His research is divided into two main areas.

The first relates to the surgical implantation of materials and implants in experimental animals for the study of the hard tissue response. This includes the biological fixation of porous materials by bone ingrowth and the long-term adaptive bone remodelling that results from the alteration of peri-implant stress distribution. An area of intense focus at the moment is the use of locally delivered bisphosphonates for enhancing peri-implant bone formation.

The second relates to mechanical studies of biomaterials and implant constructs, materials characterization, static and fatigue loading, implant stability and wear performance. The primary focus at the moment is the wear resistance of hard-on-hard hip bearings, both ceramic-ceramic and metal-metal. This involves both pin-on-disk and hip simulator studies of new and existing material combinations.


T.M.S. Chang

Director, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre
Professor Emeritus, Physiology
Professor Emeritus, Medicine
Professor Emeritus, Biomedical Engineering

Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre
McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Room 1004
Montréal, QC  H3G 1Y6
Tel: +1-514-398-3514
E-mail: artcell.med at mcgill.ca
Web site

Artificial cells; modified hemoglobin; blood substitutes; immobilized enzymes/cells/microorganisms; microencapsulation of enzymes/ cells/ microorganisms/adsorbents/drugs; biodegradable control delivery systems; biomaterials; artificial liver; artificial kidney; hemoperfusion; enzyme engineering.

Interdisciplinary research on above topics based on biotechnology, chemical engineering, chemistry, physiology and medicine.

D.L. Collins

Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Professor, Neurology and Neurosurgery

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
Montreal Neurological Institute
3801 University Street, Room WB315
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-4227
Fax: +1-514-398-2975
E-mail: louis at bic.mni.mcgill.ca
Web site

Dr. Collins works on the use of computerized image processing techniques such as non-linear image registration and model-based segmentation to automatically identify structures within the human brain and to quantify anatomical variability. He investigates neuroscientific applications of three dimensional (3D) digital image processing methods for disease diagnosis, prognosis and image-guided surgery.

These techniques are applied to large databases of magnetic resonance (MR) data from normal subjects to quantify normal anatomical variability in pediatric, young adult and elderly populations. The techniques have also been used to automatically quantify global and regional brain atrophy in MS patients and to look at morphological changes associated with diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's dementia.

In image-guided neurosurgery (IGNS), these techniques provide the surgeon with computerized tools to assist in interpreting anatomical, functional and vascular image data, permitting the effective planning and execution of minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures. Automated atlasing is essential in IGNS for thalamotomy and pallidotomy in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, or temporal-lobe depth-electrode implantation in the diagnosis of epilepsy, since tissue targets in these procedures cannot be viewed directly on MR. Computerized atlasing minimizes trauma to the patient and allows resection of the smallest amount of brain tissue necessary for effective therapeutic treatment.

A.C. Evans

Professor, Neurology and Neurosurgery
Professor, Medical Physics
Professor, Biomedical Engineering

McConnell Brain Imaging Centre
Montreal Neurological Institute
3801 University Street, Room WB2
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-8926
Fax: +1-514-398-8948
E-mail: alan at bic.mni.mcgill.ca
Web site

3-D NeuroImaging of Brain Function (PET, SPECT) and Brain Anatomy (MRI, CT); Kinetic Analysis of Tracer in Brain using PET; 3-D Brain Atlases of Human, Rat and Monkey using computerized segmentation; Imaging Physics of PET Scanners and; Functional neuroanatomy of normal cognitive processing. (P.E.T. = Positron Emission Tomography; SPECT = Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography.)

W.R.J. Funnell

Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Associate Professor, Otolaryngology
Associate Member, Obstetrics & Gynecology
Associate Member, Electrical Engineering

BioMedical Engineering Department
Duff Medical Building
3775 University Street, Room 302
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-6739
Fax: +1-514-398-7461
E-mail: robert.funnell at mcgill.ca
Web site

Middle-ear mechanics. The overall objective is to address key clinical issues related to hearing loss. The specific objectives are to (1) obtain more accurate and more detailed information from screening and diagnostic tests, especially in infants; and (2) design better techniques for repairing middle ears. The approach is to do both experimental work and computer modelling. The experimental work is complemented by experimental data from our collaborators in Antwerp. The interpretation and synthesis of the experimental data is addressed using finite-element models.

Three-dimensional modelling of complex natural structures. The objective is to develop innovative approaches to the creation of computer-based 3-D models of complex natural objects, for the purposes of both visualization and simulation. The emphasis is on the creation of high-quality finite-element models for complex structures consisting of multiple heterogeneous substructures.

3-D models for teaching. The current emphasis is on the use of interactive 3-D models for teaching anatomy, and on the use of haptics (force feedback) for endoscopy training.

C. Grova

Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurosurgery

BioMedical Engineering Department
Duff Medical Building
3775 University Street, Room 304
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-2516
Fax: +1-514-398-7461
E-mail: christophe.grova at mcgill.ca
Web site

Dr. Grova investigates multimodal data fusion to characterize brain mechanisms and especially epileptic activity. His research project aims at developing methods to appropriately combine multimodal data in order to detect additional information that could be missed by considering each modality individually. A typical challenge is to combine modalities directly measuring neuronal activity with high temporal resolution with other modalities indirectly measuring the same function with high spatial resolution, through hemodynamic processes for instance. The project will involve the integration of three promising functional modalities:

(1) Simultaneous ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) - MagnetoEncephaloGraphy (MEG) acquisitions, measuring directly on the scalp electric and magnetic components of signals generated by neurons synchronously active (at a ms scale).

(2) Simultaneous EEG - functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging fMRI acquisitions to measure, within the whole brain at a second scale, hemodynamic responses that correlate with signals detected on scalp EEG.

(3) Simultaneous EEG - Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS) acquisitions to measure local changes in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin at the time of signals detected on scalp EEG, by exploiting absorption properties of infrared light within brain tissues using optic fibres placed on the surface of the head.

The principal clinical application of this project will be to combine these three modalities using multimodal data fusion techniques to characterize brain regions involved during epileptic activity.

D. Juncker

Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering

BioMedical Engineering Department
740, Dr. Penfield Avenue, Room 6206
Montréal, QC  H3A 1A4
Tel: +1-514-398-7676
Fax: +1-514-398-1790
E-mail: david.juncker at mcgill.ca
Web site

Micro and Nanotechnologies supported the integration , miniaturization, and large scale parallelization of microelectronics with an exponential growth for over 40 years that has come to be known as Moore's law. This exponential growth has fuelled the "digital revolution". The power of miniaturization and parallelization, enabled by microtechnologies, has started to bear on the life sciences, and already revolutionized them, by means of DNA microarrays and high throughput DNA sequencing running millions of biochemical reactions in parallel, as opposed to a single reaction at a time just a few years ago.

Dr. Juncker is designing and developing micro and nanobioengineering technologies – with a strong focus microfluidic systems – and are using these technologies for miniaturizing and parallelizing proteomics and cell biology. His goal to emulate the parallelization of DNA microarrays and sequencers, and enable systematic and quantitative approach to biological experimentation for protein analysis and cell biology in particular. Systematic and quantitative biology will in turn help accelerate the study, the understanding, and the modelization of cells and of diseases such as cancer as complex (biological) systems.

J. Nadeau

Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Associate Member, Physics
Associate Member, Microbiology & Immunology
Adjunct Professor, Institute of Molecular Biophysics, Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine

BioMedical Engineering Department
Duff Medical Building
3775 University Street, Room 310
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-8372
Fax: +1-514-398-7461
E-mail: jay.nadeau at mcgill.ca
Web site

Dr. Nadeau specializes in the use of fluorescent nanocrystals and novel genetically-encoded probes for labeling and imaging of cultured cells. Her group synthesizes and characterizes nanoparticles of various materials, clone and express membrane proteins, and labels and images live cells.

Dr. Nadeau's work has two main branches: one, to characterize the basic photophysics of nanoparticle probes for fluorescence, CT, and MR imaging. This work includes steady-state and time resolved spectroscopy, electron microscopy, XPR, particle sizing, and blinking analysis. Collaborators are at McGill, the University of Maine and USC.

The second branch involves investigation of the biological effects of nanoparticles, including their toxicity to the environment and their possible use as anti-cancer drugs. Collaborators are with the Radiation Physics group at McGill, and at UCSB.

G.B. Pike

Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Professor, Neurology and Neurosurgery
Professor, Medical Physics Unit
Professor, Radiology
Associate Member, Electrical Engineering
Coordinator, McConnell Brain Imaging Centre

Montreal Neurological Institute
3801 University Street, Room WB316
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-1929
Fax: +1-514-398-2975
E-mail: bruce.pike at mcgill.ca
Web site

Dr. Pike investigates magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods and applications for basic and clinical neuroscience research. As his primary focus, he measures the physiological modulations that are involved in neuronal activation using methods termed functional MRI. fMRI can detect changes in blood oxygenation and tissue perfusion with a high temporal and spatial resolution. It also provides a powerful tool for studying brain physiology and pathophysiology. Recently, Dr. Pike used his novel functional MRI methods to determine, for the first time, the quantitative relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption in the cortex over a broad range of activation and inhibition conditions in both healthy subjects and epilepsy patients. Dr. Pike has also developed a quantitative MRI technique, termed magnetization transfer (MT) imaging, that probes the magnetic interaction between macromolecules and water. Using MT imaging, his group has revealed focal pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients that precedes the development of conventional MRI detected MS lesions by up to 2 years. Other areas of active research in Dr. Pike's lab include diffusion imaging, white matter fibre tractography, relaxometry, neuropsychiatric lupus imaging, fMRI of lexical ambiguity, and molecular MRI.

S. Prakash


Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Member, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre
Associate Member, Physiology
BioMedical Engineering Department
Duff Medical Building
3775 University Street, Room 311
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-3676
Fax: +1-514-398-7461
E-mail: satya.prakash at mcgill.ca
Web site

The primary research interest of this laboratory is in several innovative areas of artificial cells, microencapsulation, cell therapy, tissue engineering, nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, biomaterials, drug delivery, bacterial cell therapy, medical device engineering, and other biomedical technology developments. The research is focused on the development of new medical treatment strategies including novel cell and drug-based therapies.

Specifically, the research team is investigating cholesterol lowering formulations, fatty liver therapeutics, therapeutic protein delivery, novel therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, wound healing, and formulations for use in colon and breast cancers. The research team is also investigating basic mechanisms for the design of artificial organ substitutes such as artificial kidney, liver and skin. 

In recent years, the research team has contributed to the advancement and development of bioengineered, target specific, and controlled-release delivery systems. These systems are focused on designing artificial cell microcapsules to encapsulate mammalian cells, bacterial cells and other microorganisms, enzymes, small peptides, DNA and other active drugs. Such biotherapeutics are capable of targeting specific sites and are used in our research to design formulation for clinical applications.

In addition, the research team is developing systems that integrate bioengineering and tissue engineering principals, with gene and cell therapies, to design new therapeutic products. The present engineered formulations and devices have been applied in numerous areas including biomedicine, bioengineering, industry and clinical settings.

M. Tabrizian

Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Professor, Faculty of Dentistry
Associate Member, Montreal Heart Institute
Associate Member, Sainte-Justine Hospital

BioMedical Engineering Department
Duff Medical Building
3775 University Street, Room 313
Montréal, QC  H3A 2B4
Tel: +1-514-398-8129
Fax: +1-514-398-7461
E-mail: maryam.tabrizian at mcgill.ca
Web site

Dr. Tabrizian's research programme is focused on surface and biointerface, and the modification of the biomaterials surface to make them more attractive for biological environment. The surface modifications are mostly based on biological and chemical methods to improve the biointerface interactions at cellar and/or molecular levels. This involves the following ongoing projects:


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Maintained by R. Funnell
Last modified: 2011-09-24 08:16:05